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Posts Tagged ‘eucharist’

Download 20th Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. The Book of Proverbs shares many short wisdom sayings. Wisdom and Foolishness are two pathways we can walk. Two ‘women’, are presented as preparing a home and a banquet. A prostitute (foolishness) chapters 5-7. A Lady (wisdom) chapters 8-9. Stolen bread and water are contrasted with fine food. Which voice and house will you enter? Where do you go for ‘wisdom’ and ‘guidance’? What recent wisdom have you learnt from walking down wrong paths?
  2. Paul continues to explain the life-style of a baptised person in his letter to the Ephesians: ‘watch carefully how you live’. When was the last opportunity you took to  have some time of reflection and review of your life….. asking for a clear vision and trying to understand ‘what is the will of the Lord’. Consider planning a few hours in the week to reflect on how you could live the life-style of Christ more deeply.
  3. We are at week 4 of 5 weeks sitting with the Gospel of John chapter 6. Jesus has challenged the Jewish understanding of Passover ‘bread from Heaven’ and insists he is the one sent from Heaven. He is ‘living bread’ and he goes even further to claim he will give his ‘flesh’ for the life of the world. Ponder what the symbol and experience of ‘bread’ means for you. How is Jesus’ life like ‘bread’ for you?
  4. The gospel of John invites us to make a significant transition from ‘bread’ [the Jewish Passover meal] to ‘flesh-and-blood’ – the whole person [Jesus’ replacement of the passover with the offering of his life on the cross]. The special Jewish celebration of God’s love and forgiveness is now replaced with the Cross – the sign of God’s love and forgiveness for the whole world. Unleavened Bread and Passover Lamb has now become a sacrificial meal transformed. Wine and Bread is now transformed to Blood and Flesh because Jesus has said it, promised it, given it. Enlightened or confused?
  5. The deep language and expression of love helps our heart seeking understanding. Love desires to ‘give’ and gift one’s ‘presence’ to the beloved. To resolve the human difficulty of not knowing how to come to God, we find God comes to us through the gift of the true presence of Jesus in the body and blood at Mass. We are seated at a God-given (wisdom) banquet. For John, it is not enough to ‘believe’ in Jesus, we are also called to ‘receive’ the physical gift and life-presence of Jesus into our physical bodies. Do you receive in ‘ignorance’ or with ‘knowledge’?
  6. True life, ‘eternal life’ is given and received. The life and spirit of Jesus is now present within the receiver of the Eucharist (good -gift). It is because of this truth we call the experience ‘Holy – Communion (many becoming one with the one who is Holy – God). After receiving communion how could you develop a greater appreciation of this physical intimacy with Jesus? Consider making up a personal prayer to pray at this time of silence after communion.
  7. St Thomas Aquinas offers two simple sentences for reflection. Where do these sentences lead you in reflection…..
  • “What food is our bodies, the eucharist if for our souls”.
  • “The proper effect of the Eucharist is to transform us into God”
  1. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

Download Reflection – 19th Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. The continuing theme of being ‘fed by God’ is developed in the readings this week. Elijah sits exhausted under a tree in the desert. He is being hunted down by Princess Jezebel who was married to the King of Israel. She tried to replace all prophets and temples of Yahweh by importing 450 prophets and followers of B’aal from her homeland in Sidon. Elijah has just killed them all and is now on the run! (see 1Kings 18, 19-46). Have you ever got into difficulty as a result of obedience to God? Have you ever said to God: ‘this is enough’? Is there any painful purifying of the Church that you find particularly difficult to participate in and endure?
  2. God encourages Elijah not to focus upon his own pain and fear. God wants to offer food and strength for the “40 day” journey ahead. Do you tend to focus on your own pain and mumble and groan? How could you develop a habit of being open to help and ‘being fed’? God wishes us to move from simply ‘surviving’ to ‘thriving’. If you were to ask God or someone for help, what would be your question in one sentence? How could you grow your hunger so you experience being ‘fed’ with scripture and the eucharist?
  3. St Paul teaches that we were ‘sealed’ at our Baptism. A ‘seal’ was a special jewel or stone or metal cylinder marked with a ‘sign’ and pressed upon clay or wax or object. The ‘mark – seal’ indicated the owners signature, ownership, authority on a legal document or object. The link between the person and / or object was now displayed to the world. As ‘sealed’ people we are to witness to whom we belong. Paul inserts attributes displaying God; kindness, compassion, forgiveness. Are you conscious of being ‘sealed’? Is there any anger or bitterness the spirit would like you to let go of so as not to ‘grieve the spirit’ dwelling in you?
  4. Jewish people often referred to their ‘laws’ as ‘bread from heaven’. Their laws and teachings from Moses gave them life and revealed God to them. They grumble and ‘murmur’ at Jesus’ claim: I am the bread that comes down from Heaven. Hidden within this phrase Jesus is claiming the Divine Name ‘I AM’ and to replace the ‘law’. He teaches further that he is true life-giving ‘bread’ but that ‘bread’ will now be replaced with ‘flesh’. John presents clearly the levels of meaning: Bread. Jesus. Flesh. Can you see in this text of John 6 the threads of our belief that in the Eucharist / Mass it is truly the ‘flesh’ of Jesus we receive? Do you recognise the invitation following reception of Jesus to now become ‘life-for-the-world’?
  5. The only way God can be truly revealed is someone must come from God and live among us. This is indeed the great religious hope of the Jewish people. However they become satisfied with the laws of God and were not ready to accept the ‘person’ of God. Jesus claims he is this person truly ‘from’ God, has ‘seen’ God. This is the claim of Christianity that sets us apart from other world religions. Because Jesus is divine – God – among – us what he promises to give us – his flesh and blood – he can and will do. As we approach the end of 5 weeks of teaching on the Eucharist consider prayerfully reading John 6. How would you explain the Eucharist now in your own words?
  6. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

 

Download 18th Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions:

  1. The Exodus story teaches us of our covenant relationship with God. Each time the people grumbled, Moses prayed to God, and God responded faithfully to his covenant love commitment. Remembering the first reading is chosen to highlight the Gospel reading, John 6 and Exodus are both reflecting on the meaning of the Jewish ‘Passover’. The treasured memory of God feeding his people with ‘manna’ (literally from the word ‘man hu’ meaning ‘what is this?’) was an essential part of the passover celebration. Rather ungratefully, God’s people continually grumbled. Do I grumble frequently against ‘Moses and Aaron…..’ How could I speak words of ‘affirmation’?  How could I practice gratefulness for the ‘daily feeding’ by God of every gift and blessing?
  2. Parts of the Letter to the Ephesians are prayers used at Baptism in the early church community. A colorful image is pointed to in the Baptism ceremony. In ancient times one’s clothing was considered part of oneself. In the ceremony you took off your old clothes and put on a new white garment. Your old self was put aside. Your new self is the life of Christ. Your new life-style is as a citizen of Heaven not a citizen of Rome. How could you show Righteousness, Holiness and Truth more in your life? Amongst your family? At work?
  3. Last week we began 5 weeks of hearing the Gospel of John chapter 6. It is important to notice the context of John 6. The famous ‘bread of life’ passage is the second of three passover celebrations in the Gospel of John. At each passover, Jesus replaces the passover with his own ‘body’ (see John 2, 6, 19). Last week the crowd tried to take Jesus away to make him ‘King’ because there was a Jewish expectation (2 Baruch 29:3,18) that there would be a miraculous feeding of bread from heaven which would reveal the promised Messiah. Jesus comments to the crowd, they are only looking and  working for ‘food’ to fill their bellies. He promises something greater. Can you understand what Jesus is doing when he claims he is the ‘Son of Man’, the one on whom the Father, God, has ‘set his seal’? What does it mean if you ‘set your seal’ upon your letter, object…?
  4. The crowd asks for proof from Jesus that he is ‘better’ than Moses who fed Israel with ‘manna’ in the desert. Jesus responds using a very important phrase: ‘I AM the bread of Life’. I AM is the divine name given by God to Moses in Ex 3,16. Jesus reminds the crowd that it was God not Moses who fed his people, and in fact,  I AM is standing right in front of you.
  5. The Gospel of John often requires the reader to step down into deeper levels of meaning. Never hungry and never thirsty recognises a physical ‘hunger’ and invites the reader to recognise a deeper spiritual hunger and thirst for life. Beyond feeding your body and satisfying your thirst, what do you really live for? What is ‘life’ for?
  6. Many people came seeking Jesus but they did not want to follow him. Jesus will soon make the connection that He is and will become the ‘bread of God’ from Heaven which gives life. He will do this with the gift of his ‘Body’ and his ‘Blood’ on the cross which will be received in the celebration of the Mass John 6, 55. Do you ‘see’ that you truly receive Jesus at Mass? Do you ‘seek’ AND ‘follow’ Jesus?
  7. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

Download Reflection – 17th Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. Over the next 5 weeks, our scripture readings focus upon the events of God feeding his people. We depart from the normal Gospel of Mark readings from Mark chapter 6 and are placed into the Gospel of John chapter 6. The next five weeks provide an opportunity for prayer and deeper reflection upon the Eucharist and its meaning for our lives.
  2. Jewish people recognised miraculous events of Prophets feeding God’s people with bread symbolised God feeding his family and satisfying their hunger. It was normal to bring Barley – which was harvested around the time of the Jewish passover – to the temple as an offering. Significantly, because the temple in the North (Gilgal) was following false Baal worship the bread / barley offering is presented to a holy man (Elisha) who distributed it to the poor.  Do you experience the prophetic connection between worship and being fed and ‘morality’ – now feeding the poor of the world on behalf of God?
  3. Last week we heard Jesus has united us all together – Jews and Gentiles. Paul encourages us ‘to live in a manner worthy….’ showing this unity. How do you experience disunity?
  4. Imagine your life, relationships, work-place. How could you practice unity-creating virtues: humility, gentleness, patience, bearing with, striving to preserve unity, maintaining a ‘bond of peace’? What is your biggest challenge?
  5. Because the Gospel of Mark (Yr B) has only 16 chapters, we jump into John chapter 6 for 5 weeks to explore Jesus’ feeing the 5,000. The story of Jesus feeding with ‘bread’ is told 6 times in the Gospels. John is the most theologically full with special words and meaning. It is around the Jewish Feast of the Passover. At passover Jewish people remembered Moses the great prophet feeding them with ‘manna in the desert’. The promised Messiah (King) would also do a miraculous feeding. We notice in each of the three Passovers of Jesus’ public ministry (Jn 2, 6, 19) the passover is fulfilled and replaced ‘with his body’. 5 loaves and 2 fish = 7 the perfect Jewish number indicating a perfect feeding. Taking the loaves, gave thanks, gave it to distribute, gather (synagein), fragments (klasma) are all special words used by the early church for the celebration of the Eucharist. Twelve indicates ‘all Jewish tribes / people’. What do you make of all these ‘clues’ in the reading today? What does this story now mean for you?
  6. In the midst of large crowds who are hungry, Philip offers no solution. Instead he remarks it will cost so much to fix this problem, 2/3rds of a years wage! What thought or feeling decides your (in)actions: cost or compassion? Do you offer your small contribution of money or compassion, or give up in the sight of large injustice / poverty / hunger?
  7. The crowds ‘see’ the sign Jesus has worked, think of him as ‘truly the prophet’ they have been waiting for – the Messiah. The one promised. They wish to make him King. A Political Ruler. Why do you think Jesus ‘withdraws’? Why is the ‘lifting up of Jesus’ on the cross the enthronement moment in the gospel of John?
  8. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

 

Download 16th Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. Jeremiah had witnessed over 10 years Jerusalem being captured, the Holy Temple destroyed and God’s people walked out of their land into exile. Jeremiah’s early message and warning to the King and people had been ignored. The King even burnt Jeremiah’s first manuscript of writings and warnings! Jeremiah spoke to the ‘Shepherds’ – Priests and Rulers of Israel and told them they were at fault for not helping people remain close to God. Their ‘lack of care’ caused people to be ‘scattered’. What qualities do you wish to see in your Leaders? ‘Priests’? How could you encourage them in their responsibility as shepherds? Does ‘leadership’ also require ‘followship’?
  2. St Paul is the great teacher of how Jews and Gentiles – two peoples who were very ‘distant’ and ‘dis-liking’ of each other – have become one family through Jesus. How? The laws teaching Jews to be ‘separate’ from everyone else have now been completed and ‘abolished’. The purpose of the ‘laws’ was to be close to God. The ‘blood of christ’ has now become the forgiving sacrifice given by God to show all sin and ‘distance’ has been removed. And this applies to everyone. Jews and Greeks (Gentiles). Have you had any experience that united you to many people?  Do you recognise this takes place profoundly at Mass?
  3. Can you identify any barriers of culture, language, fear, perception that has stopped you feeling and living as a ‘brother or sister’ with someone different from you? What would be required to ‘put that enmity (obstacle causing hostility) to death? Is there a ‘clean’ ‘unclean’ distinction at the root of the problem? What do you think St Paul would say?
  4. Today is the only time in the Gospel of Mark the word ‘Apostles’ is used. It means ‘ones sent’. We come ‘from’ someone and ‘report’ back to someone. Disciples are missioned by Jesus and need to return to Jesus. Jesus ‘takes them to a deserted place’. So excited, so busy ‘they had no opportunity even to eat’, Jesus guides his disciples toward rest. Do you consider you have a healthy balance of ‘work and rest’? Where is your ‘deserted place’? What is the most enjoyable way you find to ‘rest’? Jewish people connected ‘rest’ with ‘sabbath’. Are you allowing Sunday to be experience of real ‘rest’?
  5. Imagine a close family and personal friend has died. A busy atmosphere at home or work. People demanding many things. While wanting to rest, there is a vast crowd needing you. Jesus was ‘moved with pity’. The word is translated also as compassion – mercy – which has its origin in the Jewish word for ‘womb’. What does this teach about Jesus? Can you relate to this experience? When have you ‘fed’ people with your life, words, presence? What happened?
  6. This passage of Jesus teaching a large crowd will lead to his feeding the Jewish crowds (Mark 6) and the Gentile crowds (Mark 8). To teach us more about this the next 5 Sundays will jump into the Gospel of John chapter 6. Jesus, the Righteous Shepherd and True King of Israel will feed all people with the Eucharist. The Bread from Heaven. Consider a personal decision how you could learn more about the Eucharist over the next 5 weeks. Prayerfully reflect on John 6.
  7. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

 

 

Download Feast of Corpus Christi

Reflection Questions

  1. The Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi) began as a response to increased devotion to the real presence of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament in the 12th Century. This led to a desire to ‘see’, Jesus in the consecrated elements. In 1220 in Paris the practice of elevating the host began.
  2. A Covenant was a binding agreement and promise between two parties. Moses conducts a ‘sacrifice’ which seals the bond between God and Israel. Blood = life. Life = God. Everyone sprinkled now participates in a relationship and keeps the ‘agreement’: the 10 commandments. Being sprinkled with ‘blood’ was a very significant event. How would you make a life-long bond and commitment today? Can you connect the sprinkling of blood, the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross, the blood of the covenant in the eucharist?
  3. The New Testament Letter to the Hebrews explores the Book of Numbers and Leviticus and helps us understand Jesus as fulfilling and replacing the role of the High Priest in the Temple. The Feast of the Atonement (at-one-ment described in Lev 16) involved God forgiving sins through the action of blood being rubbed on the Mercy Seat in the most holy of holies, the tabernacle. Life represented by Blood rubs out Death represented by Sin. As well as blood bringing forgiveness, the ashes of a sacrifice were sprinkled onto water and it became ‘waters of purification’ for blessing and making people ‘clean’. Can you see the links to Holy Water as we enter the Church? Our Bodies receiving the blood of Christ in the chalice? The Cross of Jesus is in the Cup? How could you prepare yourself to make this a deeply special experience?
  4. The Jewish Passover involved a special meal with meat of a lamb (sacrifice), bread (remembering both unleavened bread and the quick escape from Egypt and the manna from heaven while in the desert) and cups of wine (the 3rd cup  remembered passing through the red sea from Egypt into the desert). Jesus now changes the words and actions and institutes a new sacred meal. He speaks interpretative words upon the bread and wine to teach us his meaning. He longer looks backward in history, but forward to the next day of his death on the cross. The unrisen bread will now become his body broken on the cross. The 3rd cup of wine will become his blood poured out establishing a new covenant. Do you see the beauty and eternal significance of the celebration of Mass? Do you have any questions to ask that would help you grow in faith and understanding? Who could you ask?
  5. Receiving Jesus in Holy Communion can become ‘easy’ and ‘ordinary’. The Feast of the Body and Blood of Jesus highlights the importance of the Mass in our lives. Do you accept the invitation to be in a ‘covenant’ and intimate relationship with God? Will you seek to maintain union in prayer and action during the week? Will you agree to ‘participate’ in the building of the Kingdom of God of peace and justice? Are you willing to imitate Christ; to live for God and love all people to the extent that your body is broken and your blood poured out? Can you see a deeper invitation as you receive Jesus?
  6. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

 

Download 5th Sunday Easter Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. God is a God of surprises but the disciples were afraid of Saul. They could not imagine the greatest source of persecution could ‘turn-around’. The situation required someone courageous like Barnabas. He had the knickname ‘son of encouragement’. He had witnessed Saul in Damascus and stepped up to being a mentor. A link. Introduced Paul to the Apostles. Imagine the loss for the Church if Barnabas hadn’t ‘taken charge of him’? Who is on the ‘outside’ of your group, community, workplace whom you could include?
  2. Barnabas and Paul show us the cost of the committed christian life. They are ‘radicals’. They go a bit further. Without people like Barnabas and Paul the Church is stagnant. Paul’s first preaching experiences to the Hellenists (Greeks) in Damascus and Jerusalem ended with attempts to ‘kill him’. And yet both Paul and Barnabas did not stop. Have you met resistance in preaching the message of life and peace of Jesus? Do you have a safe place like Paul’s home in Tarsus to retreat to when necessary?
  3. LOVE is lived. It looks like something. Too easily love can stay in ‘word or speech’ and not make it to ‘deed and truth’. What love action could you commit to this week that you have struggled with for a while? What words or promises have you made but you have failed to back up with action?
  4. The image of the Gospel this Sunday is of life flowing through the vine into the branches.  ‘Remain in me’ repeats itself 6 times! Remain in me is different from remain close to me or read my book. How could you go 1 step further in praying with scripture, celebrating the sacraments, living christian community?
  5. The intimacy of the ‘vine’ image for John’s gospel is a description of the church and the individual disciple. In baptism we were truly joined to Jesus’ mystical body the Church. In the eucharistic union of our lives with the body and blood of Jesus in ‘holy communion’ we are called to bear the ‘fruit’ of replicating the life of Jesus in the world. Pray with the idea of being ‘fruitful’ and bringing ‘glory’ to the Father. What do you begin to think about?
  6. Jesus shares that the experience of praying with his Word is like being ‘pruned’. Have you experienced the scriptures ‘cutting’ and bringing you pain? Yet also directing you to what is life-giving?
  7. What is one action that you will do to be ‘livingtheword’ this week?

 

 

 

Take some time to get into the week of holy celebrations. Each ceremony has much to teach us.

Holy Saturday Vigil Readings – In this ceremony we wait in expectant hope. With symbols of fire and light, water and oil, the great celebration of victory over sin and death, being washed clean and joined to Christ and annointed to continue his saving mission unfolds as we celebrate and welcome new members into the body of Christ.

Download Easter Sunday – In this ceremony the Easter story begins to be told and shared. The meaning of Jesus rising from the dead and his message to his followers unfolds for the next 6 weeks of the Easter season.

Download Easter Sunday Yr B

Reflection Questions

  1. Acts chapter 10 is an very significant part of the New Testament. It is hard for us to understand just how big were the divisions between Jews and Non Jews (Gentiles). Jews were not allowed to enter a Gentile house and were certainly not allowed to ‘eat a meal together’. Acts 10 reveals the story of Peter entering a Gentile home and having a meal with a Gentile (and Roman Soldier!) Cornelius.  Peter had a vision from God that the ʻgentilesʼ were ʻcleanʼ and could sit at table together with Jews. This message would upset many who had long held religious views of separation. What obstacle may God wish to remove within you so you can sit together with an ‘enemy’? Who do you consider ʻuncleanʼ?
  2. Before the Feast of the Passover Jewish women would spend hours sweeping and tidying their homes. They particularly got rid of any ʻleavenʼ (yeast to make the bread rise). It was a symbol of sin, capable of affecting the whole ʻloafʼ. In response to the Resurrection we are called to be ʻnewʼ, people of the light, walking out of darkness. What particular action, habit, area of my life will I seek to tidy and sweep during the season of Easter as a response to living the new life of the Resurrection?
  3. John’s gospel has Mary of Magdala, Simon Peter and the Beloved Disciple (John) – three foundational members of the early christian community – walking about confused. Belief in the Resurrection was not something that happened instantly. Even the ‘other disciple’ who saw burial cloths before Peter, had to look again before he believed. What has been your experience of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Saturday Vigil. What have you seen? What do you remember? What was shown to you by God to help you ‘believe’?
  4. Imagine someone you have loved in a very intimate and special way. This person died and you were personally involved in seeing the death, the burial. In grief you go to the place of burial and see first-hand that your friend is not there. There is evidence of burial cloths and a messenger that ʻhe has been raisedʼ and that your friend so wants to meet with you and you will see each other soon. What would be your thoughts and feelings? If the resurrection is true, what change in thinking happens about death? About life? About God?
  5. What is one action that you will do to ‘livetheword’ this week?

 

Take some time to get into the week of holy celebrations. Each ceremony has much to teach us.

Holy Thursday remembers Jesus’ last supper with his disciples. In this ceremony we remember how Jesus established a new covenant where the Jewish Passover is replaced with a new sacred ritual of the Eucharist, and the final instruction to live in humble service – wash feet – is to be the trademark of christians. In receiving the true presence of the Body and Blood of Jesus into our lives we are called to make a gift of our own bodies, lives, humble service for the cleansing and repair of the world.

Download: Holy Thursday Readings – In this ceremony we celebrate how Jesus replaced the Jewish Passover with a new covenant – the Eucharist – and we wash each others feet as a reminder of the last symbolic action Jesus left for his disciples to live in humble service.

Reflect on the video and scripture readings and move this from the historical to the person.

Enjoy and Share

 

Download 18th Sunday Yr A

Reflection Questions:

  1. Isaiah 40-55 is known as ‘The Book of Comfort’. God will comfort and look after his people. In ancient cultures a relationship and bond of commitment was sealed by a meal together. They also acknowledged with a prayer of thanksgiving that something was sacrificed (an animal, a grain of wheat..) in order that human beings were fed. A ‘sacrifice’ enabled a ‘meal’ which established a ‘bond between the participants of a meal’. This is the basis of a ‘covenant’ meal in the Old Testament, the Last Supper and indeed the Eucharist Christians celebrate. God promises to feed us without money being paid. And to nourish us both physically and spiritually. Consider the gifts God gives you each day. How has God been ‘feeding’ you?
  2. St Paul himself endured being beaten, stoned, whipped, shipwrecked, imprisoned. Yet he boldly declares nothing can separate us from God’s love revealed in Christ. What current experience causes you to think and feel ‘separated’ from Christ? Does Christ on the Cross ‘bridge this gap’?
  3. Matthew 13 was filled with Parables on the Kingdom of Heaven, Matthew 14 is now concerned with the Kingdom of the Church and the mission of the Disciples. We are taught how we are to be and live.
  4. John the Baptist, the greatest prophet, has been killed. This sadness causes Jesus to retreat to a deserted and lonely place. Consider all the feelings of Jesus in loosing a very close companion. Wanting silence and rest. Having a crowd chase after him. Tired and yet moved with pity and willing to give of himself. What do you learn about Jesus? About God? About yourself?
  5. John the Baptist spoke courageously reminding Herod he cannot marry his brothers wife. Why does the world seek to remove the ‘voice’ of a prophet? Have you experienced the tension and risk in being a ‘prophet’ today? What happened?
  6. Matthew is seeking to show Jesus as the fulfilment of Moses and all the prophets. Parallel to the feeding in the desert (Moses / Exodus) Jesus now feeds a large crowd in a ‘deserted place’ with bread. There is an abundance of food (a symbol of the great messianic age). Each Apostle is left holding one of 12 baskets of bread symbolic of the new Tribe of Israel (Church). The Disciples now have the job of feeding the hungry. Imaginatively enter the scene and pretend to be a disciple. What did you learn?
  7. The Disciples had a ‘poverty mentality’. Jesus had an ‘abundance mentality’ when even a small amount of resources were offered to God. Consider your response to the ‘poor and hungry’ this week. What could you do with the little you have?
  8. What is one action that you will do to ‘livetheword’ this week?